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't work now. gwen: countdown to election day. and on the airwaves, the big debate looms, 40 days to go as the candidates drill down on the economy. >> you think if we spend another $5 trillion on tax cuts for the wealthiest americans, all our problems are going to go away? >> his plan is the spluss, how did the first one go. how much of it did you get? it was cash for clunkers. did you get help from that? gwen: and duke it on foreign policy. >> i'm pretty certain there will be bumps in the road because in a lot of these places, the one organizing brell has been islam. >> he said the developments in the middle east are bumps in the road. [laughter] >> yeah, that was my reaction. bumps in the road? these are not bumps in the road. these are human lives. gwen: the candidates, the polls, the issues, the voters, we are in the heartland tonight. covering the week, charles babington of the associated press, nia-malika henderson of the "washington post." jim tankersley of "national journal" and jeff delaney of the "new york times." >> this is a special election 2012 edition of "washington week
.s. presidential election campaign enters a critical week. and the miracle at medinah. europe's golfers stage one of the sport's greatest comebacks in the ryder cup. >> welcome to our viewers on pbs in america and around the globe. over the past week, peopling at the u.n. publicly weighed in the debate about what to do about the syrian conflict. today it was syria's turn to respond. president assad was unsurprisingly absent from the podium. instead, the talking was left to the country's foreign minister. walid muallem accused those spork terrorism in his country and prostriding arms to his army. he said calling president assad to step down would be serious to the affairs. he met with the secretary general to show compassion to their own people. but just how far is all the rhetoric got us? i'm joined here in the studio by steve from the u.s. institute of peace. steve, thank you very much indeed for coming in. listening to muallem's speech, what sort of insight does it give us into the way the syrian regime is thinking right now? >> well, the foreign minister repeated almost verbatim what they call
landscape simply because you got elected president and willed to do it. the country has to need that or want that. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> intel. sponsors of tomorrow. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a healthy, productive life. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: president obama faced an international audience today against the backdrop of a reelection campaign at home and anti-american violence abroad. the president took the stage at the unitedded nations urging the assembledded leaders to address the wave of anger across the muslim world. >> the attacks of last two weeks are not simply an assault on america. they're also an assault on the very ideals upon
increasingly focused on that after the election and there's still a lot of uncertainty about how that's ultimately going to play out. >> reporter: historically, october has been a rather ho-hum month for stocks, despite the market crashes that have come during the month in a few years. and, curiously, october has proven an excellent time to buy stocks in the past. suzanne pratt, "n.b.r.," new york. >> i'm erika miller in new york. still ahead, i'll show you the hottest toys your kids may be asking for this holiday season. >> it's been four years since bank of america bought merrill lynch. today, b of a agreed to bay $2.4 billion to settle an investor lawsuit. shareholders claimed bank of america hit facts of the buyouts such as losses of merrill lynch and billions of dollars in bonuses. they settled to eliminate the uncertainty, burden, and expense of further litigation." this doesn't end legal problems for bank of america. it still faces lawsuit for mortgages of countrywide which they bought. >> they will say, this is a huge settlement by all standards and what about other settlement
their ballots before election day. >> ifill: plus, turkey's foreign minister tells margaret warner the syrian war is spilling over the border into his country. >> we have around 90,000 refugees in our camps and around 40,000 refugees in several cities. it is a humanitarian treasure. >> woodruff: from our american graduate series, ray suarez gets the teacher of the year's take on how to engage students and keep them from dropping out. ♪ >> ifill: and we remember the singer who made americans swoon. andy williams. that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: the trouble in greece today and in spain overnight brought the plight of europe's debt-ridden countries squarely back into the spotlight. street battles erupted in athens as nearly 70,000 people staged the largest demonstration since may of last year.
, mitt romney should be winning this election, because of the environmental factors working against a rock obama. i think is a testament to campaign's end candidates that campaigns do matter. the type of campaign you put together common and they do matter. they are able to counteract a very difficult environment, but i agree with you that mitt romney was chosen to be the nominee because the republican primary voter thought he was the person who could best bring the fight to barack obama on the economy. this is a specialist, so on and so forth, yet the sale has not been made, and we have seen some slippage. romney has had a steady lead. that has evaporated, and that is part of the reason we are seeing president obama poll ahead. tavis: to your mind, has 13 a clear advantage to picking mr. ryan as his running mate? >> no. i do not think there would have been anyone in phnom romney was considering taking. i do not think he was serious about taking condoleezza rice. she could have changed the conversation, but the senator from ohio or paul ryan or tim pawlenty, i do not think any of the
election stage before. romney has the advantage of having simply debated more over the last year. so i think it's kind of an even stage there, but the situation is not comparable to reagan versus carter. the economic metrics when carter was running for re- election were extremely negative, much more negative than they are today, and just this last week, polls show that the pub has more confidence in the president's economic views and vision and program than romney. so he has lost the one advantage that he once had. secondly, there were a lot of independent, undecided voters in 1980 who had lost faith in carter and were just waiting to see if they could feel confidence in his challenger. there are so few independent voters. this is an election that's about mobilizing the bases. so going after the independent voter is not a big surprise. having said all that in the memo put out by david axelrod -- >> who is who? >> he's the campaign guru on the obama side. >> right. >> he points out that five of the last six challengers won the first debate. i think the temptation by the media is going t
rights and election year fraud is playing out around the country. >> ifill: then, we have two takes on the battle for north carolina. jeffrey brown reports on the tightening presidential contest. >> brown: barack obama won this state in 2008 by the slimmest of margins with help from a large african-american turnout. four years later in a down economy it looks like his challenge will be even greater. >> woodruff: and we talk with national public radio's greg allen. he focuses on the outreach to hispanics in the tar heel state. >> ifill: then margaret warner updates the investigation into the assault on the u.s. consulate in libya. >> woodruff: we look at new findings showing australia's great barrier reef has lost half its coral in the last 27 years. >> ifill: and we close with snapshots of three of this year's macarthur genius award winners, each with a unique view of war. >> people tend to look at the military, they tend to look at war and they tend to look at conflict as something very black and white. it's not like that at all. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. ma
. >> the american legislative exchange council, or alec. >> alec is a nationwide consortium of elected state legislators working side by side with some of america's most powerful corporations. they have an agenda you should know about, a mission to remake america, changing the country by, changing its laws, one state at a time. alec creates what it calls "model legislation," pro-corporate laws its members push in statehouses across the country. alec says close to a thousand bills, based at least in part on its models, are introduced each year and an average of 200 pass. this has been going on for decades, but somehow alec managed to remain the most influential corporate-funded, political organization you'd never heard of -- until a gun shot sounded in the florida night. >>> trayvon martin unarmed, but for a bag of candy and iced tea that he was carrying. >> you'll recall that the shooter in trayvon martin's death was protected at first by florida's so-called stand your ground law. that law was the work of the national rifle association. there's its lobbyist standing right beside governor jeb
'm elected president of this country, i will get us back on a road of growth and prosperity and strength. >> woodruff: today at a campaign event in washington, president obama shared a message of what he called "economic patriotism" tied to a strong middle class. >> but our problems can be solved, our challenges can be met. we've still got the workers in the world, the best universities, the best scientists, the best... we got the best stuff. ( laughter ) we just got to bring it together. >> woodruff: consumer confidence is higher of late, and the president may be getting a boost from voter attitudes. an nbc news/"wall street journal" poll out last week found 42% of americans think the economy will improve in the next year. that's six points higher than a month ago. 18% say the economy will worsen, and almost a third expect it to stay the same. the obama campaign is also pointing to some revised job numbers to make its case. the u.s. bureau of labor statistics said yesterday there were nearly 400,000 more jobs created in the previous year that ended in march. that would mean that there a
to predict consumer spending this holiday season. the big wild card is the presidential election. >> this is the most difficult year we've ever had to predict our forecast, because there's never been this level of uncertainty in terms of tax and spending policy really in our history. >> reporter: his organization, the national retail federation, is forecasting a 4.1% gain. but the international council of shopping centers is more cautious, predicting an increase of less than 3%. shoppertrak and deloitte fall in the middle. some of the differences can be blamed on conflicting economic signs. higher home prices and stock prices are boosting consumer confidence. >> people are always looking for something to give them a real sort of positive outlook, something to make them feel better. shopping is pretty much one thing to make most people feel better if they can. >> reporter: but job growth is weak, and food and gasoline prices are rising. with so much uncertainty, you can expect to see lots of holiday promotions. but tv ads will come later. >> in normal years, we'd already start to
's magness arena for the first of three election debates. tonight's encounter, moderated by the "newshour's" own jim lehrer, is to focus on domestic policy. the first half of the 90-minute face-off will be spent on the number one issue for most voters this year: the economy. joining us for the debate, and here with us now to preview what to expect tonight are two familiar faces syndicated columnist mark shields and "new york times" columnist david brooks. gentlemen, welcome. the night is finally here. mark, no pressure, just 60 million people will be watching. what are you looking for from tonighta encounter? >> what i'm looking for, judy, is that the-- the candidate who understands of the two that the most important thing is not making a mistake but really making a point as to what his presidency would be about. i think both of them are geared because so much has been-- attention has been directed to gaffes in the past that affected or influenced, shamed the outcome, that impression. it's a magic moment. with no pundits, no prism of edtorm columnists, 60 million individuals sit down in a
investors back to a bit of follow tillity. we have the election, events in europe and certainly the eerntion season coming up. a lot of things that can cause the volatility we saw today. >> so was's your prediction for the dow and the s&p. the dow is a few hundred points away from reaching its record high from back in 2007, the 14,000 level. you think that's going to happen or not? >> no, i don't think we'll see new highs there and the s&p is only maybe 7% away. i don't think we'll see new highs there either. i think we'll hang on to most of the gapes that we've achieved so far this year. but it wouldn't surprise me to give a little bit back. remember profits are very lackluster, actually going to be down year-over-year as we get the third-quarter results in, and we have that looming fiscal cliff issue out there. you mentioned the fed but q e3 is helpful but if we go over the fiscal cliff it is like getting a flu shot before storming the beech at normandiz. >> susie: that's an interesting picture. talking about the fed, what was your take on what ben bernanke said today, that the economy is
in this election. there is going to be even more importance in the future. quarter of all americans under 18 are latino. canvassing in colorado, a swing state where the latino vote is hugely important. now, some are disappointed that he has not done more to help the illegal immigrants that come across the border. a few find this election a hard choice. >> we know that there is only one candidate that supports any kind of immigration reform that is of any real value and of course that is obama. romney would turn back any progress we have made. >> a lot of republicans see the hispanic vote as a huge prize. what has gone wrong? when ronald reagan said that latinos were naturally republican, he met that they were aspirational and socially conservative. mitt romney seems to turn them off. he backed a law in arizona which some said was racial profiling. he called for a high-tech fence along the mexican border and struck a hard note talking about illegal immigrants. >> the answer is self deportation, people decide that they can do better work here because they don't have legal documentation. >> the
'donnell. >> rose: do you think this election the president has said that change has to come from outside rather than in washington, that this election has the possibility of producing a change that will be able to overcome gridlock. >> i don't think it to the only has the possibility, i think it almost certainly will. and let me explain why. i think the president's going to win but let's assume governor romney won. if he wins, that almost certainly means the republicans will hold on to the house and it will be about 50/50 in the senate, more or less the way it is now. you can't filibuster a budget. it's the only thing that doesn't require 60 votes in the senate to pass o as opposed to 51. so a lot of the policymaking will be pushed into the budget and he'll just have to pick up one or two people on that. if you assume that he is going to do what he said he's going to do, i think a lot of his priorities will be enacted. and i think it will be bad on the budget side, as i said. including for medicare t will drive the medicare trust fund out-- dry up the money by 2016. if what i think is going to
. tomorrow, we continue "politics >> how are traders in general viewing the election? >> well, the election is opinions aside, and no entity. obama is ahead. all the polls in the key states, the battleground states, obama has a lead as well. the markets discounted an obama win, and as a result, this bullish for risk, and for oil as well. >> how high do you continuing crude could go? >> i think $96, $97. not because of an obama victory, but because of bifurcation economically around the world. oi. the split side, what happen fist we can have a romney victory. >> i think oil rallies in either case. if romney wins, it rallies more, because romney victory is risk conducive which would send oil higher. >> ho how big is the uncertaint? >> much less than a few months ago. the morkt has begun to sdounlt an obama victory. not because of political uncertainty, but more because of economic certains. >> once we get beyond the election, what will be the driver for crude? >> economic growth, hands down. fi. we look at the crude contracts >> one of the benefits of trading crew, is you can trade it on the
the election, we need to get past the fiscal cliff, have some certainty about the conduct of fiscal policy over 2013, and maybe see some further progress in europe to lift this veil of uncertainty that's holding back both businesses and households. >> reporter: at the margin, the falling number of people filing for unemployment insurance is likely to bolster consumer confidence. but economists are looking for about a 100,000 increase in payrolls in the september employment report out next friday. call that a guarded outlook. >> in the fourth quarter, we think job growth is going to pick back up. we have had some sluggishness in job growth in recent months. ultimately, we do expect businesses to feel they need to hire somewhat more. that, we think, will resume a downward trend in the unemployment rate. so we think the next move on job growth is up rather than down. >> reporter: the bright spot in the economy is housing. pending home sales slipped 2.6% in august, but that was still a better reading than last year at this time. overall home prices, sales and construction are all trending up. >> so
a very uncertain future. >> with every presidential election campaign here in the u.s. comes on entire business dedicated to promoting the candidate. anything, basically from badges, ribbons, posters, to the millions spent on television advertisements. now, from a mountain has gone under display online. it seems like those buttons have a long tradition. >> we are looking at 1952. this is an archive of presidential campaign memorabilia from 1952 until the present. >> vote for president johnson. >> we have about 400 commercials. we started off by going to the different presidential libraries and correcting videos and converting this to the digital files. you can jump to any election year. you can click on 1980. that will take you right to a page for ronald reagan vs. jimmy carter. the commercials are 30 seconds or a minute that they summarize what was going on in the campaign to tell us what the main issues are. they were not intended to last as a historical record or if you look at years and years later. these are really important historical archives. >> these were made for the obama ca
and their lack of any concern at all. we are going to have a $7 billion federal election cycle this time. that is a lot of money being raised and spent on the campaign. that is a lot of rich people talking in both parties. the democrats still have some heart in there but they still swing to a far to the right as far as i'm concerned, but the republicans, that is the whole meeting of the party is the super rich and those who can be distracted because the message that they are propounding would take america in such an awful direction. but both parties are too beholden to big money. neither party takes on vested interests. i agree is the audacity of hope if i could coin a phrase that in a second term, president obama would assess what happened in the first term, how much a true need of america was tripped up by powerful interests and would be prepared to take it on. we have had that in our history at various times. great reformist president. both parties -- theodore roosevelt on the republican side. franklin roosevelt pa on franklin rooseveltr on the democratic side. kennedy and johnson. we
of the labor party after the defeat in 2010 general election. but that job went to his brother, ed miliband, since leaving front line politics, david miliband has been busy and a member of parliament, since 2001, and continues in that role, he has a community organizing campaign, i am pleased to have him back on this program. >> very nice to be back. >> so what are you doing with your life? >> i try and be a better dad, that's to the best thing i have stepped up to but i 32 to stay up with foreign affairs, i thik it is important in this time in the west people are challenging us to withdraw from the world and just focus on our own local problems, i want to stay engaged in that and i work on some buying issues in the uk, unemployment with the youth is important and there is so much disaffection in politics i have launched this political organizing. > how is your brother do. >> he is doing great. >> why aren't you there now? >> because i think in my position i end up becoming a perpetual commentary where the media wants me commenting on him, and i was determined to go to the -- i have been f
of the presidential election could impact gold prices. i'll interview gold trader anthony neglia. >> tom: european markets tumbled as greek workers called a 24 hour strike to protest new austerity measures. over 50,000 people gathered to protest new salary and pension cuts, near the parliament building in athens, and some of the protests erupted into violence. on wall street: the dow fell 44 points, the nasdaq lost 24, and the s&p down eight points. >> tom: radio shack shook up its executive ranks today, as the troubled retailer looks to survive in an increasingly crowded market place. >> for the first time ever save $5 on our original pocket realistic weather radio, now on sale at radio shack stores only $10.95. >> tom: today, weather is a just a click away on a smart-phone. after little more than a year as c.e.o., james gooch is out, leaving the company and giving up his seat on radio shack's board of directors. the decision was called mutual. ruben ramirez reports on what's next for the shack. >> reporter: if a company's share price is a barometer of the c.e.o.'s performance then it should come
'll go far. [ female announcer ] wells fargo. announcer: the following is a pbs election 2012 special presentation. man: this program was made possible by the charles a. frueauff foundation, the w.k. kellogg foundation, the missouri foundation for health, the silverweed foundation, the park foundation, the odyssey fund, the spunk fund, the trull foundation and the fledgling fund. brownlee: we have this idea in this country that when it comes to healthcare, more is better. you can't be too thin or too rich, and you can't get enough healthcare. fisher: we all come to a similar conclusion that about 30% of u.s. healthcare spending is devoted to unnecessary services, and that's, you know, $800 billion a year. you don't have a significant blockage. james: one person's waste is nearly always another person's income, and income turns into strong political defenses of areas that are classic waste. brownlee: we spend 2 1/2 times more per capita than the average western european country spends, but the part that i'm most worried about is the waste that actually hurts patients. hill: there's a l
government will have to resign when the elections take place, probably next-- after that, it will be for the political parties, depending on the outcome of the election, to express their wishes as to the new political configuration of italy. >> rose: in the end, because you are not a politician was good for the emergency that italy faced? >> i-- i mean, obviously, i cannot judge whether this government is doing or not the right things. but in order to do the things that we are doing, i think it helped not to be a politician, not to have to fight for consensus, but simply to try and have the support of the three largest political groups in the parliament, which have given us their support, in spite of not having personalities of theirs in the government. and the funny thing about it-- i say "funny" but in the end very encouraging, not so much for this government but for the country, is that italians have been submitted to probably the toughest and most intensive care ever. and they-- they're not happy of the individual measures that we had to take. but they seem to trust t
there is an elected civilian president that is trying to assert the degree of independence at a moment when both sides are now trying to understand the priorities of each other, and the united states is adjusting to an egyptian leader that has to respond to some degree to the wants and desires of his own people. it is a much more high maintenance type of relationship because nothing can be taken for granted in the same way that it was when egypt was essentially a client state. >> president morsi called syria the tragedy of the age. any new ideas there about how to stop the fighting? >> not so much. this is indicative of egypt's position at the moment. more aspirational and ambitious with respect to charting a more independent course, but of course egypt is consumed by domestic affairs, particularly on the economic front. so egypt is not in a position to really exert great influence on the syrian civil war. it is not a proxy player in the sense of supporting any of the sides there, yet it does not have the wherewithal to be a useful facilitator with the iranians in terms of trying to bring about some s
will wait to see who wins the american elections and whether in the aftermath, president obama, who is very much seized with this issue, will continue to be seized with it. >> thank you very much. world leaders at the u.n. have also debated the line between free speech and religious intolerance following the anti- islamic video. it caused ripples across the muslim world. in pakistan, at least 20 were killed in demonstrations. who exactly are the demonstrators? we are in karachi. >> they have been gathering here every day to pray. for the soul of muhammed, a policeman. become to try to comfort his mother. she said she does not understand why her son, a muslim, became the enemy. his family says that he himself had been upset by the anti-islam video. >> they said this was going to be a peaceful rally for the honor of the prophet. we were shocked to see the terrorist and weapons there. >> the family watched the news channels in horror as the demonstrations became more violent. and then on live tv, they saw their sign being carried from the scene. -- saw their son being carried from the scene. >
issue in brazil, there are 2 million voters that can decide an election. it is very hard to make changes. >> it is time for school in this neighborhood. this is the second session of the day. brazil has done a good job getting more children into the education system that now there are not enough schools is like many, this one runs three ships. it is progress. a lot of the children come from families that hardly had any education. this boy says his mother only studied until fourth grade and he is not sure but maybe his father made it to fit. this girl is determined to go all the way through college and says studying is the path for the future. that ambition and gives her a challenge. her own training was minimal. she stepped into her first-class room with no practical experience and it was terrifying. with minimal resources, this school is trying hard but if it cannot provide the skilled work force to satisfy the demands of the economy, brazilian companies will look elsewhere for labor. >> it is a big, busy city. >> they will look for people like this person working as a head hunter. >> b
governing body. the body which would be empowered to prepare elections and the new constitution. and the government appointed such interlocutory, that position didn't do the same, they rejected the document altogether. this was, as i said, the consensus on the political part of the crises which by al-awlaki outside players. later we suggested to endorse these documents and the security council and our partners refused to the it. >> rose: what happened with mr. assad on this document. >> under this dump, the government and their position must appoint interlocutories and to discussion on the basis of agreement who would be part of the transitional governing body. this body would have full authority in the country. and would be in charge, you know, to prepare the new constitutional draft to be put referendum and to prepare for free and fair elections. >> rose: do you think it's unreasonable to ask president assad after all the killing by the government about the syrians to step down? >> well, it's something which people say. and we have a choice. we have put as number one priorit
corruption. >> rose: and he's leaving-- there's a new election in 2014. he will be departing, we assume. >> yeah. and it's for the afghans to elect their leadership. but let me add to this that we have actually seen progress in the development of afghanistan. the economic growth is around 7% to 8% annually from low level, but it's quite impressive. more people have access to electricity. we see flourishing markets. the educational system has improved. eight million children go to school. more than one-third are girls. 30% of teachers are female teachers. the health situation is better. more health centers have opened. child mortality has decreased. life expectancy has increased in particular for women. so we have seen a lot of progress in afghanistan. >> rose: do you believe that there will be some success in closing down the sort of porousness of the afghan/pakistan border so the taliban forces, which have had a kind of safe haven can be closed? >> the border region is really a problem. and wherever we engage with the pakistani government or pakistani military we encourage them to step
've had 10 presidential elections with televised debates. in three of them one candidate went into the first debate leading and another candidate came out of the last debate leading much it's turnedded campaigns in 1960 and 1980 and in 2000. so it can be done but it's a high task for sure. >> remember, we've been campaigning or we haven't been campaigning but the candidates have been campaigning for six months now. >> woodruff: do you agree with susan that a debate can change the trajectory of a race? >> i do. i think it can but it doesn't... it wasn't automatically change a trajectory. something significant has to happen. one of the contestants, one of the debaters has to say something that produces a lot of controversy for two or three days or do something, whether it's a... make a face, look at his watch. something has to happen that the voters look at. it changes how they evaluate the candidate. judy, the way i would put it is everybody needs to take a collective breath after this and say, wait a minute, maybe i need to reassess the campaign. that's what the romney folks n
Search Results 0 to 45 of about 46 (some duplicates have been removed)

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